8
Sep
Griffin Doyle

Indoor air quality sensors can complement EU efforts

Indoor air quality sensors could be an important tool in many European public buildings in the years to come, as part of EU-wide efforts to monitor air pollution.

The PASODOBLE project has developed a system called Myair, which can provide information about air quality to hospitals and doctors, environmental officials and even members of the public.

It’s focused on tackling the problem of air pollution ‘hotspots’, for example the Po Valley in Italy, where the Alps block westerly winds and industrial nitrous dioxide emissions can then accumulate.

Within the UK, London is another known problem area, and parts of Belgium, the Netherlands, France and Germany can be problematic too.

Myair is designed for outdoor air pollution levels; however, there is a good case for complementing it with indoor air quality sensors and smart use of air conditioning.

For example, on a day when environmental air pollution is at a high, air conditioning could be used in public buildings such as hospitals – where patients might already have breathing difficulties – to tackle pollutants and ensure that indoor air quality remains good.